Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited

Description

The Ohio Humanities Council opens the photographic exhibition, "Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited," March 30 at COSI in Columbus.

The exhibit remains on display at COSI through May 1 when it will go on tour throughout the state.  COSI is open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon until 6 p.m.

"Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited" includes photographs made by the Farm Security Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Works Projects Administration during the 1930s and images of those same sites today.  Part of a larger project to help Ohioans explore the legacy of the Great Depression and the New Deal, this rephotographic survey highlights two years of research and was created by a team of award-winning photographers under the direction of OHC staff person Pat Williamsen.

"Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited" features images by Helen Hoffelt, Columbus; Sean Hughes, Cincinnati; Fredrik Marsh, Columbus; Ardine Nelson, Columbus; Joel Whitaker, Dayton; and Lynn Whitney, Bowling Green.  The communities they visited for rephotographic work include Buckeye Lake, Cincinnati, Circleville, Columbus, Greenhills, Lancaster, Newark, Plain City, Somerset, Waterville, and Urbana.

After its showing at COSI in Columbus, "Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited" will travel to Port Clinton, Troy, and Zanesville.

"Images of the Great Depression in Ohio: Documentary Portraits Revisited" was funded by grants from the We the People initiative at the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ohio Arts Council, the Thomas R. Schiff Fund at the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, and Epson America, Inc.

The Ohio Humanities Council, a state-based partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports public programs to help Ohioans connect what they learn with the way they live.  For more information, visit the Ohio Humanities Council at www.ohiohumanities.org.

Credits

Pat Williamsen, M.A., James Calder, M.A.